(Source: jinchiku)

jtotheizzoe:

Are These Cave Paintings The First Animations?
Over at Nautilus, Zach Zorich illuminates how 21,000 year-old cave paintings at Lascaux may represent an early form of motion picture.
Many of the superimposed animal shapes, like the deer heads above (photo by Norbert Aujoulet), can appear to move like a flip-book when they are viewed with the dim, flickering light sources that would have been available to Paleolithic humans. Combine it with some low-light trickery on behalf of the visual system, and you’ve got cave-toons:

Physiologically, our eyes undergo a switch when we slip into darkness. In bright light, eyes primarily rely on the color-sensitive cells in our retinas called cones, but in low light the cones don’t have enough photons to work with and cells that sense black and white gradients, called rods, take over. That’s why in low light, colors fade, shadows become harder to distinguish from actual objects, and the soft boundaries between things disappear. Images straight ahead of us look out of focus, as if they were seen in our peripheral vision. The end result for early humans who viewed cave paintings by firelight might have been that a deer with multiple heads, for example, resembled a single, animated beast.

Storytelling, visual or otherwise, is simply part of what makes human.
Previously: Archaeologist Marc Azema has found similar story-paintings at Chauvet, even older than Lascaux!
(via Nautilus)

jtotheizzoe:

Are These Cave Paintings The First Animations?

Over at Nautilus, Zach Zorich illuminates how 21,000 year-old cave paintings at Lascaux may represent an early form of motion picture.

Many of the superimposed animal shapes, like the deer heads above (photo by Norbert Aujoulet), can appear to move like a flip-book when they are viewed with the dim, flickering light sources that would have been available to Paleolithic humans. Combine it with some low-light trickery on behalf of the visual system, and you’ve got cave-toons:

Physiologically, our eyes undergo a switch when we slip into darkness. In bright light, eyes primarily rely on the color-sensitive cells in our retinas called cones, but in low light the cones don’t have enough photons to work with and cells that sense black and white gradients, called rods, take over. That’s why in low light, colors fade, shadows become harder to distinguish from actual objects, and the soft boundaries between things disappear. Images straight ahead of us look out of focus, as if they were seen in our peripheral vision. The end result for early humans who viewed cave paintings by firelight might have been that a deer with multiple heads, for example, resembled a single, animated beast.

Storytelling, visual or otherwise, is simply part of what makes human.

Previously: Archaeologist Marc Azema has found similar story-paintings at Chauvet, even older than Lascaux!

(via Nautilus)

astronomicalwonders:

Celestial scribbled notes
This colour-composite image was obtained by FORS1 on ANTU. It displays a sky area near the Chamaeleon I complex of bright nebulae and hot stars in the constellation of the same name, close to the southern celestial pole. This picture was taken a few days before the Paranal Inauguration and the “hand-over” to the astronomers on April 1, 1999. This colour composite photo of the Chamaeleon I area is based on six 1-min exposures obtained with VLT UT1 + FORS1 in the V, R and I bands. The sky field measures 6.8 x 11.2 arcmin2; North is up and East is left.
Credit: ESO

astronomicalwonders:

Celestial scribbled notes

This colour-composite image was obtained by FORS1 on ANTU. It displays a sky area near the Chamaeleon I complex of bright nebulae and hot stars in the constellation of the same name, close to the southern celestial pole. This picture was taken a few days before the Paranal Inauguration and the “hand-over” to the astronomers on April 1, 1999. This colour composite photo of the Chamaeleon I area is based on six 1-min exposures obtained with VLT UT1 + FORS1 in the V, R and I bands. The sky field measures 6.8 x 11.2 arcmin2; North is up and East is left.

Credit: ESO

adrians:

adrians:

the best thing about having the house to myself is that I can make breakfast in my underwear

image

astronomicalwonders:

The Omega Nebula, M17 or NGC6618
Credit: ESO

astronomicalwonders:

The Omega Nebula, M17 or NGC6618

Credit: ESO

astronomicalwonders:

The Dumbbell Nebula
The Dumbbell Nebula ­— also known as Messier 27 or NGC 6853 — is a typical planetary nebula and is located in the constellation Vulpecula (The Fox). The distance is rather uncertain, but is believed to be around 1,200 light-years. It was first described by the French astronomer and comet hunter Charles Messier who found it in 1764 and included it as no. 27 in his famous list of extended sky objects. Despite its class, the Dumbbell Nebula has nothing to do with planets. It consists of very rarified gas that has been ejected from the hot central star (well visible on this photo), now in one of the last evolutionary stages. The gas atoms in the nebula are excited (heated) by the intense ultraviolet radiation from this star and emit strongly at specific wavelengths.
Credit: ESO

astronomicalwonders:

The Dumbbell Nebula

The Dumbbell Nebula ­— also known as Messier 27 or NGC 6853 — is a typical planetary nebula and is located in the constellation Vulpecula (The Fox). The distance is rather uncertain, but is believed to be around 1,200 light-years. It was first described by the French astronomer and comet hunter Charles Messier who found it in 1764 and included it as no. 27 in his famous list of extended sky objects. Despite its class, the Dumbbell Nebula has nothing to do with planets. It consists of very rarified gas that has been ejected from the hot central star (well visible on this photo), now in one of the last evolutionary stages. The gas atoms in the nebula are excited (heated) by the intense ultraviolet radiation from this star and emit strongly at specific wavelengths.

Credit: ESO

enchantinghearts:

Portugal: Castelo Dos Mouros (by Simone Angelucci)

enchantinghearts:

Portugal: Castelo Dos Mouros (by Simone Angelucci)

(Source: therocketequation)

titaniumelemental:

coolator:

battleroyale2wasashitmovie:

railroadsoftware:

lisaspliffson:

All she did was ask what his name was

the 2010s is torontos decade man they keep producing winner after winner.

Im not exaggerating this is literally how older men in toronto are theyre either completely weird and delusional or conspiracy theorists that have lost touch with all reality and think the goverment is plotting and scheming on the low 

HOW CAN YOU DIE WHEN YOU’RE DEAD?!

I lost it when he ripped his shirt open.

(Source: bluemoonofkentucky)

kawaiicornsnake:

suitupweird:

Inspiration | Women In Menswear | Wear It Weird

I’m gonna die

"That one bullet changed everything. Their mistrust turned to outrage, and dissidence spread like a contagion."

(Source: lieutenanthawteye)

brightestofcentaurus:

W49A
W49A is a star forming region located about 36,000 light years from Earth, across the Milky Way. It is nearly 100 times brighter than the Orion Nebula, but is so obscured by dust that it is much more difficult to observe. Prolific star formation is occurring in the region, similar to that found in “starburst” galaxies, which form stars 100 times faster than the Milky Way.
W49A contains an extremely dense star cluster. The region, about 10 light years long, holds nearly 100,000 stars, and more are forming. The density may protect the cluster from gravitational tides that usually quickly dismantle such structures. A few billion years in the future the area could become as dense as a globular cluster.
Image from ESO, information from Harvard.

brightestofcentaurus:

W49A

W49A is a star forming region located about 36,000 light years from Earth, across the Milky Way. It is nearly 100 times brighter than the Orion Nebula, but is so obscured by dust that it is much more difficult to observe. Prolific star formation is occurring in the region, similar to that found in “starburst” galaxies, which form stars 100 times faster than the Milky Way.

W49A contains an extremely dense star cluster. The region, about 10 light years long, holds nearly 100,000 stars, and more are forming. The density may protect the cluster from gravitational tides that usually quickly dismantle such structures. A few billion years in the future the area could become as dense as a globular cluster.

Image from ESO, information from Harvard.

jehovahs:

diancie:

meladoodle:

i love it when ugly people call other people ugly its weird

95% of Tumblr

image

popstronomy:

Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey - Part 4